The families in the cold war era as told by elaine tyler may

When middle-class women "found that professionalized homemaking was not enough to keep their minds alive. To avoid dire consequences, men as well as women had to contain their sexuality in marriage where masculine men would be in control with sexually submissive competent homemakers at their side.

American Families in the Cold War Era," Elaine Tyler May proposes that our foreign policy of "containment" of the Soviet sphere of influence had its domestic analogue in an ideology of domestic "containment.

These comments, even more than the statistical data, seem to reveal that women were much less satisfied with the state of domestic affairs of the era.

Nor does she view this era as a return to Victorian ethos; her examination of the sexual mores of the day reveals that there was a containment of sexual expression to within the marriage contract and nuclear family rather than a repression of sexuality.

In those of the McCarthy era, from "the Senate to the FBI, from anti-communists in Hollywood to Mickey Spillane, moral weakness was associated with sexual degeneracy, which allegedly led to communism.

Homeward Bound: American Families In The Cold War Era

It was well written, documented, and researched. The voices of about 60 couples who appended spontaneous comments tell Cheever-like stories.

While she would have hoped that American society might have looked at the resulting increase of women in the workforce as a fundamental change in postwar society, the fact is that the increased participation of women was viewed as a temporary situation in reaction to crisis.

However, there was no other choice; married women who worked outside the home were ostracized and viewed with suspicion. She statistically documents her premises as well as including numerous case studies.

Strong families required two essential ingredients: For those of us whose intellects were formulated during the postwar era, her book helps us understand who we are and from whence we came.

To her chagrin, the domesticity of women became the norm, and the man became the undisputed king of his castle. Her inclusion of photos and posters help illustrate her points. Of particular interest were the comments, written by the survey participants in their own words, describing their personal opinions about their satisfaction with their marriages and their sexuality.

She asserts that the period, sandwiched between the roaring 20s, the depression, and the reawakening of activism in the late 60s and 70s, does not represent the benchmark for American culture, but an era unique in its own way.

Viable long-term job prospects for women might have prompted new ways of structuring family roles [italics mine: Lowell Kelly, a psychologist at the University of Michigan, who was interested in the long-term personality development among married persons, conducted it.

More than merely a metaphor for the Cold War on the homefront, containment aptly describes the way in which public policy, personal behavior, and even political values were focused on the home.

American Families in the Cold War Era provides a walk down memory lane. The marriage of one couple who had had premarital sex was pervaded with distrust because the husband, wedded to the double standard, could never recover his respect for his wife. Her larger aim is to dismantle the iron curtain that this culture especially academic culture has imagined between domestic and political events.

The KLS was a survey of the interaction between the ideals and the behavior of about six-hundred men and women who formed families during the s and s.

She makes the point that the nuclear family of the era, in spite of the nostalgia, may have not been as homogeneous as appears on the surface. She sees it as being the most effective route to the wider changes she advocates--"restructuring of the labor force along gender-neutral lines, ending sex segregation in the workplace and bringing about a realignment of domestic roles.

In spotlighting the condition of "contained" homemakers, however, May makes us see afresh how diabolical sexism is.Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era - Ebook written by Elaine Tyler May.

Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era/5(2). In "Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era," Elaine Tyler May proposes that our foreign policy of "containment" of the Soviet sphere of influence had its domestic analogue in an ideology of domestic "containment.".

Read the full-text online edition of Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era (). Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era. By Elaine Tyler May. No cover image. Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era.

By Elaine Tyler May. Read preview. Elaine Tyler May opened her book, Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era, with a description of a publicity stunt.

A young couple, recently married, chooses to spend their honeymoon in a bomb shelter/5. Elaine Tyler May demonstrated that the Cold War infused life on every level from the boardroom to the bedroom. This new edition includes up-to-date information and references, along with an epilogue that examines how the legacy of the Cold War has shaped America since September 11, /5(K).

Elaine Tyler May's text "Homeward Bound: American Families in the Cold War Era", remains a classic in American Studies-and example of relevant, clear, well-written scholarship utilizing a variety of data to make a interesting and important case.5/5.

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The families in the cold war era as told by elaine tyler may
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